MPT Thirty-K SAE 5W30 Synthetic Motor Oil

Test Results and PQIA Assessment

Product: MPT Thirty-K Synthetic Motor Oil
Viscosity Grade: SAE 5W30 
Labeled: “Recommended for API SN/SM/SL/SJ/SH/SG/CF and ACEA A3/B3/B4,GM dexos1® (GM-LL-A-025, GM6094M and GM4718M)”
Manufactured By: MPT Industries, Dover, NJ

Website(s): mptindustries.com

Company Information:
According to the MPT website, “Since 1985 MPT Industries has set the standard for improvements in appearance chemical and lubrication technology.” The company manufactures a “wide variety of products including lubricants, greases, additives, thread sealants, and paint sealants designed for consumer, automotive, industrial, medical, farming, marine, and aerospace applications.”

Front Label
Side Label 1
Back Label
Side Label 2

Test Results and PQIA Assessment

Assessment Summary

The results of the tests conducted on the sample of MPT THIRTY-K does NOT meet the SAE J300 specifications for the SAE 5W-30 Viscosity Grade listed on the product labels. The Cold Crank Viscosity at -30°C for the sample is nearly twice the maximum for an SAE 5W-30 motor oil. In addition, the labels on this product state it is “Recommended for API SN/SM/SL/SJ/SH/SG/CF and ACEA A3/B3/B4, GM dexos1® (GM-LL-A-025, GM6094M and GM4718M)” but do not display the API Donut, or any other certifying symbol, certifying that it is licensed and meets the performance requirements set by the API or GM. 

Physical Properties

Elemental Analysis

Labeling

Note: The labels are not in compliance with NIST Handbook 130 -2020 (Current Edition) – Uniform Laws and Regulations in the Areas of Legal Metrology and Engine Fuel Quality. Specific to this regulation, section 3.12.1.3. states that the label on any vehicle engine oil container shall identify the specific vehicle or engine manufacturer standards met.

Based on the claims on the label and PQIA’s analysis, this product has an unusual composition. As such, the high tin and silicon levels may be associated with novel additives, and/or contamination. 

Although laboratory tests alone cannot be used to establish if engine oil meets an API Service Category, they can be used to determine if it doesn’t. The test results and PQIA assessment relates ONLY to the sample tested and the tests conducted. 

Volatility

Standard
MPT Thirty-K
Status

NOACK  Volatility, % Loss, 1 hour @ 245.2°C

See Note
5.4

Note: The Noack volatility specification for an API SN and SN Plus/GF-5 is 15% Maximum. Many engine manufacturers specify a maximum allowable evaporation loss (volatility) different from API SN Plus. General Motor for example, sets a maximum of 13% Noack for its dexos® specification.  ACEA specifications are a maximum of 13% Noack and some OEM’s require even lower values.

Viscosity
Standard
MPT Thirty-K
Status
Viscosity 100°C cSt
9.3 to <12.5
11.16
Viscosity 40°C cSt
74.23
Viscosity Index
142
Cold Crank Viscosity at -30°C
6,600 Max
12,544
yello

Viscosity is a critical measure that determines how thick or thin a lubricant is. Viscosity is measured by several methods to determine the behavior of motor oil during cold startups and while hot at operating temperatures. Motor oils must meet Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J-300 standards to conform to a specific viscosity grade. >>More

Viscosity Index measures the change in viscosity with temperature. Viscosity Index improver additives are used to optimize viscosity at different temperatures. >>More

Detergent Additives and Total Base Number (TBN)
Standard
MPT Thirty-K
Status
Calcium (ppm)
1,635
Magnesium (ppm)
593
Sodium (ppm)
17
Barium (ppm)
<1
TBN, mg KOH/g (ASTM D2896)
13.25

Detergent additives help to keep metal surfaces in an engine clean by controlling formation of deposits (i.e. sludge, varnishes). Such deposits can harm an engine by clogging oil passages that lubricate an engine, increase wear and reduce engine performance. A blend of calcium and magnesium-based detergents are most commonly used. A shift towards increased use of magnesium was required to address the needs of new gasoline direct injected (GDI) engines. >>More 

Detergent additives also help prevent corrosive wear by neutralizing acids formed as a by-product of combustion and other processes in an engine. Total Base Number (TBN) is a laboratory test that measures an oil’s ability to neutralize such acids. >>More

Antiwear Additives (parts per million)
Standard
MPT Thirty-K
Status
Phosphorus
600 to 800 -a
792
Zinc
906
Molybdenum
1,027
Titanium
<1
Boron
133

Antiwear (AW) additives help protect metal surfaces against impact friction and wear between moving parts in an engine. Such additives work by adhering to metal surfaces and forming a protective film between moving surfaces. The most widely used AW additive are chemistries containing phosphorus and zinc. Some lubricant manufacturers also employ the use of antiwear additives containing boron, molybdenum and titanium among others.

Antiwear additives are multifunctional in that they also act as corrosion inhibitors and, more significantly, antioxidants.

For more on AW additives and other functional and performance additives used in motor oil… >>More

Contaminants (parts per million)
Standard
MPT Thirty-K
Status
Silicon*
23
Silver
<1
Aluminum
<1
Chromium
<1
Iron
1
Nickel
<1
Lead
<1
Antimony
<1
Tin
40
Copper
<1
Vanadium
<1
Potassium
<5
Manganese
<1

Although motor oil is subject to contamination from a number of metals related to wear, and abrasive material in the form of silicon when in use, new motor oil typically does not contain such metals at any appreciable levels. The presence of these metals (iron, aluminum, copper, lead, nickel, tin, sodium, potassium, etc.) in a new motor oil can indicate contamination from used oil, rust, abrasives, and others introduced to the product during blending, packaging, and/or transportation. Such contaminants can be harmful to an engine. Some can also be part of an additive, such as copper or sodium, but these are not often seen.

*Whereas silicon in the form of polydimethylpolysiloxane is commonly used as an antifoamant in motor oil, such use typically does not exceed 10ppm in new motor oil. Levels much above indicate possible contamination with abrasive material, silicone-based sealers, and/or transformer and hydraulic oil.

Note1: Standards are established by API, SAE and others.
Note2: Test Method for metal analysis is ASTM D5185.

  1. This specification is expressed to one significant figure, therefore results between 550 and 849 are considered on specification.

Viscosity is a critical measure that determines how thick or thin a lubricant is. Viscosity is measured by several methods to determine the behavior of motor oil during cold startups and while hot at operating temperatures. Motor oils must meet Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J-300 standards to conform to a specific viscosity grade. >>More

Viscosity Index measures the change in viscosity with temperature. Viscosity Index improver additives are used to optimize viscosity at different temperatures. >>More

Detergent additives help to keep metal surfaces in an engine clean by controlling formation of deposits (i.e. sludge, varnishes). Such deposits can harm an engine by clogging oil passages that lubricate an engine, increase wear and reduce engine performance. A blend of calcium and magnesium-based detergents are most commonly used. A shift towards increased use of magnesium was required to address the needs of new gasoline direct injected (GDI) engines.

Detergent additives also help prevent corrosive wear by neutralizing acids formed as a by-product of combustion and other processes in an engine. Total Base Number (TBN) is a laboratory test that measures an oil’s ability to neutralize such acids. >>More

Antiwear (AW) additives help protect metal surfaces against impact friction and wear between moving parts in an engine. Such additives work by adhering to metal surfaces and forming a protective film between moving surfaces. The most widely used AW additive are chemistries containing phosphorus and zinc. Some lubricant manufacturers also employ the use of antiwear additives containing boron, molybdenum and titanium among others.

Antiwear additives are multifunctional in that they also act as corrosion inhibitors and, more significantly, antioxidants.

For more on AW additives and other functional and performance additives used in motor oil… >>More

Contaminants: Although motor oil is subject to contamination from a number of metals related to wear, and abrasive material in the form of silicon when in use, new motor oil typically does not contain such metals at any appreciable levels. The presence of these metals (iron, aluminum, copper, lead, nickel, tin, sodium, potassium, etc.) in a new motor oil can indicate contamination from used oil, rust, abrasives, and others introduced to the product during blending, packaging, and/or transportation. Such contaminants can be harmful to an engine. Some can also be part of an additive, such as copper or sodium, but these are not often seen these days.

*Whereas silicon in the form of polydimethylpolysiloxane is commonly used as an antifoamant in motor oil, such use typically does not exceed 10ppm in new motor oil. Levels much above indicate possible contamination with abrasive material, silicone-based sealers, and/or transformer and hydraulic oil.

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